THIRD PIAAC INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

Madrid, Spain :: 6-8 November 2016

Speakers biographies

Samuel Bentolila

Samuel Bentolila is a Professor at CEMFI (Madrid) and has a PhD in Economics from MIT.

His research focuses on labor economics including topics such as unemployment, wages, firing costs, temporary jobs, the labor share, migration, and youth moving-out decisions.

 

Luis Garicano

Professor Luis Garicano is Programme Director for the MSc Economics and Management programme at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He earned two bachelor's degrees, one in economics in 1990 and one in law in 1991, both from Universidad de Valladolid in Spain. He earned a master's degree in European economic studies from the College of Europe in Belgium in 1992.

 

Andy Green

Andy Green is Professor of Comparative Social Science at the Institute of Education, University of London and Director of the ERSC Research Centre on Learning and Life Chances in Knowledge Economies and Societies (LLAKES). After graduating in English literature at Oxford University, he worked for ten years teaching sociology, literacy and numeracy in colleges of further education in London ...

 

Jan Paul Heisig

Jan Paul Heisig is a senior researcher in the research unit “Skill Formation and Labor Markets” at WZB Berlin Social Science Center. He holds a PhD in Sociology from Freie Universität Berlin and has been a visitor at Stanford University and the University of Amsterdam. His research interests include education, labor markets, public policy, social inequality, and quantitative methods.

 

Béatrice d’Hombres

Béatrice d’Hombres has been a senior scientist at the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission since 2006. She holds a PhD in economics from the Centre for Studies and Research on International Development in France and has more than ten years of experience in applied micro-econometrics and impact evaluation methods.

 

Caglar Ozden

Caglar Ozden, a Turkish national, is a Senior Economist in the World Bank's Development Research Group (Trade and Integration team). He received his undergraduate degrees in economics and industrial engineering from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University. Prior to joining the World Bank six years ago, he was on the faculty of the economics department at Emory University.

 

Sara de la Rica

Sara de la Rica is full Professor of Economics at the University of the Basque Country (Spain).

Since 2007, she is Associate Fellow of FEDEA (Spanish Foundation for Applied Economics), as the director of the Research Grant “Fuentes Quintana”, promoted jointly be the Banque of Spain and FEDEA.

 

Heike Solga

Heike Solga is director of the research unit “Skill Formation and Labor market” at the WZB - Berlin Social Science Center and professor for sociology at the Free University Berlin. Her research interests are sociology of education, labor market research, and life course research. She was the chairwoman of the scientific advisory board of the PIAAC study for Germany.

 

S (“Subu”) V Subramanian

S (“Subu”) V Subramanian is a Professor of Population Health and Geography at the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (HSPH), and a senior core faculty at the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies (http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/faculty/sv-subramanian/).

 

Simon Wiederhold

Simon Wiederhold is an economist at the Ifo Institute for Economic Research in Munich, one of Germany’s leading economic think tanks.

His research asks which kind of knowledge matters most for prosperity, what determines knowledge generation, and which kind of policy can contribute to promoting the generation of knowledge. He is also interested in understanding the determinants and consequences of innovation (primarily broadband Internet). He has published his work in journals such as the European Economic Review, the Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, and the American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics.

 

Libertad González

Libertad González is a Professor of Economics at Universidad Pompeu Fabra and Barcelona GSE. She hods a PhD in Economics from Northwestern University, and has been a visitor at Columbia University and Boston University. Her research lies in the areas of Labor, Public, and Health Economics.

 
 

Sara de la Rica

Sara de la Rica is full Professor of Economics at the University of the Basque Country (Spain).

Since 2007, she is Associate Fellow of FEDEA (Spanish Foundation for Applied Economics), as the director of the Research Grant “Fuentes Quintana”, promoted jointly be the Banque of Spain and FEDEA.

She is also Associate Fellow of other European Research Institute, such as CReAM, located in London, and IZA, located in Bonn. Since 2012, Sara is Co-editor of the Academic Journal IZA Journal of European Studies. Her field of research is primarily focused on the empirical analysis of the Labour Market.

She has published in many international leading academic journals. Her most prominent publications concern labour market aspects regarding gender, immigration and Labour Market Institutions. For the last years, unemployment in Spain has been one of the topics she has been particularly focused on.

The complete list of her publications can be found in her personal website: www.saradelarica.com

Samuel Bentolila

Samuel Bentolila is a Professor at CEMFI (Madrid) and has a PhD in Economics from MIT.

His research focuses on labor economics including topics such as unemployment, wages, firing costs, temporary jobs, the labor share, migration, and youth moving-out decisions.

He has published his work in journals such as the Review of Economic Studies, the Economic Journal, and the European Economic Review, among others, and has co-authored three books. Previously, he was the President of the Spanish Economic Association, and he is currently a Fellow of the European Economic Association and a Research Fellow of CEPR (London) and CESifo (Munich).

He has worked as a consultant for the World Bank and the Spanish Ministry of Labor.

He contributes regularly to the blog "Nada es Gratis" and occasionally writes in the blog VoxEU.org and in the press.

S (“Subu”) V Subramanian

S (“Subu”) V Subramanian is a Professor of Population Health and Geography at the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (HSPH), and a senior core faculty at the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies (http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/faculty/sv-subramanian/). He is also the Founding Director of the Interdisciplinary PhD program in Population Health Sciences at Harvard. He received his under- and post-graduate training at the University of Delhi, and completed his PhD in geography from the University of Portsmouth, UK in 2000.

Subu has published nearly 500 articles, book chapters, and books in the field of social and contextual determinants of health, health inequalities in India, and applied multilevel statistical models. His current research interests include exploring the concept of variation for population health, the reciprocal association between neighborhoods and health; and understanding the causes and consequences of undernutrition among children in disadvantaged settings.

As an educator, Subu was the first to develop a course on the concept and application of multilevel statistical methods at Harvard, which he has been successfully teaching at Harvard since 2001, as well as around the world. He has advised over 100 masters, doctoral and postdoctoral students as mentor, academic advisor and dissertation committee member. Subu is the Co-Editor-in-Chief for the international journal Social Science & Medicine (SSM), in addition to be being a Co-Senior Editor for the social epidemiology office of SSM. He is also the founding Co-Editor-in-Chief of a new journal SSM – Population Health. He is an editorial consultant to The Lancet, an international advisory board member for the Lancet Global Health.

Heike Solga

Heike Solga is director of the research unit “Skill Formation and Labor market” at the WZB - Berlin Social Science Center and professor for sociology at the Free University Berlin. Her research interests are sociology of education, labor market research, and life course research. She was the chairwoman of the scientific advisory board of the PIAAC study for Germany. She is involved in the German National Education Panel Study (NEPS), responsible for vocational education and training and entry into the labor market.

Current research projects are: School-to-work transitions of less-educated youth; apprenticeship recruitment practises of German firms; information asymmetries and educational decisions; variation in employment opportunities of low-skilled workers; education; economic inequalities; and the social investment state.

Among her important (English-language) publications are:

  • Skill Formation – Interdisciplinary and Cross-National Perspectives (Cambridge University Press, 2008, edited together with Karl Ulrich Mayer)
  • Secondary education systems and the general skills of less- and intermediate-educated adults: A comparison of 18 countries (Sociology of Education, 2015, together with Jan P. Heisig, Jan Paul)
  • How employers use signals of cognitive and noncognitive skills at labor market entry. Insights from field experiments (European Sociological Review, 2015, together with Paula Protsch)
  • Context Matters: Economic Marginalisation of Low-Educated Workers in Cross-National Perspective (European Sociological Review, 2011, together with Maurice Gesthuizen and Ralf Künster)
  • Stigmatization by negative selection: Explaining less-educated persons’ decreasing employment opportunities (European Sociological Review, 2002)
  • Transitions to Post-Communism in East Germany: Worklife Mobility of Women and Men between 1989 and 1993 (Acta Sociologica, 1999, together with Karl Ulrich Mayer and Martin Diewald).

Jan Paul Heisig

Jan Paul Heisig is a senior researcher in the research unit “Skill Formation and Labor Markets” at WZB Berlin Social Science Center. He holds a PhD in Sociology from Freie Universität Berlin and has been a visitor at Stanford University and the University of Amsterdam. His research interests include education, labor markets, public policy, social inequality, and quantitative methods. He regularly teaches advanced courses on statistical methods and data analysis, including courses on the analysis of PIAAC.

Current research projects: Immigrant-native differences in retirement income across Western Europe; consequences of late-career job loss and health shocks for economic and psychological well-being; cross-national differences in the relationship between formal qualifications and skills; returns to formal qualifications and skills on the labor market; efficient modelling of multilevel data.

Important English-language publications:

  • Late-career Risks in Changing Welfare States. Comparing Germany and the United States since the 1980s. Amsterdam University Press, 2015.
  • Secondary Education Systems and the General Skills of Less- and Intermediate-educated Adults: A Comparison of 18 Countries (Sociology of Education, 2015, with H. Solga)
  • Getting More Unequal: Rising Labor Market Inequalities among Low-skilled Men in West Germany (Research in Social Stratification and Mobility, 2015, with J. Giesecke and H. Solga)
  • Who Does More Housework: Rich or Poor? A Comparison of 33 Countries (American Sociological Review, 2011)

Andy Green

Andy Green is Professor of Comparative Social Science at the Institute of Education, University of London and Director of the ERSC Research Centre on Learning and Life Chances in Knowledge Economies and Societies (LLAKES). After graduating in English literature at Oxford University, he worked for ten years teaching sociology, literacy and numeracy in colleges of further education in London and the USA whilst studying for his PGCE at the Institute of Education and for his masters in cultural studies at the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies (CCCS) in Birmingham University. His PhD, also taken at the CCCS, was in comparative historical sociology and dealt with the rise of mass education in Europe and America. This was subsequently published as the widely acclaimed book, Education and State Formation, which received a Standing Conference on Education book prize in 1990. Subsequently he taught education history and policy at Thames Polytechnic in London before moving to the Institute of Education in 1990.

Andy Green has published widely on a range of education issues, with major works translated into Chinese, German, Japanese and Spanish. Throughout his research career he has consistently championed the application of systematic forms of comparative social and historical analysis in the study of the causes and effects of variations in national education and training systems across countries. This has most often involved techniques of logical qualitative comparison, using macro-causal analysis, but more recently has involved both qualitative and quantitative methods. Andy Green's work is probably best known for his development of the theory of education and state formation to explain the uneven development of national education systems and for his more recent work on education and globalisation which highlights the variant national educational responses to globalization and the different ways in which countries seek to compete in the global market. He is currently engaged in the development of a 'distributional theory' of the impact of education on social cohesion.

Caglar Ozden

Caglar Ozden, a Turkish national, is a Senior Economist in the World Bank's Development Research Group (Trade and Integration team). He received his undergraduate degrees in economics and industrial engineering from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University. Prior to joining the World Bank six years ago, he was on the faculty of the economics department at Emory University.

His research explores the nexus of globalization of product and labor markets, government policies and economic development. He has published numerous papers in leading academic journals which explored the dynamics of protectionist trade policies, adverse consequences of unilateral trade preferences, placement of highly educated migrants in unskilled jobs in the US labor market - the brain waste effect. His most current research explores the role of diasporas and social networks on migration flows and patterns, performance of migrants in the destination labor markets, linkages between migration, trade, and foreign direct investment flows and causes of the migration decisions of physicians from sub-Saharan Africa. He has edited three books on migration, remittances, brain drain, and their impact on economic development. The latest, International Migration, Economic Development and Policy, was published in 2007.

Luis Garicano

Professor Luis Garicano is Programme Director for the MSc Economics and Management programme at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He earned two bachelor's degrees, one in economics in 1990 and one in law in 1991, both from Universidad de Valladolid in Spain. He earned a master's degree in European economic studies from the College of Europe in Belgium in 1992. He then moved to the United States, where he earned a master's degree in economics in 1995 and a PhD in economics in 1998, both from the University of Chicago. He joined the faculty of the University of Chicago Booth School of Business in 1998, initially as Assistant Professor, progressing to Associate Professor in 2002 and full Professor in 2006. During his time at Chicago Booth he took leave to teach at the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), as well as London Business School. He joined LSE in 2007, initially as Director of Research in the Department of Management.

He has also worked as an economist for the Commission of the European Union and has been involved in efforts to promote structural reforms in the Spanish economy. In particular he has co-authored proposals to reform the labour markets, housing markets, and the pension and health systems. He recently wrote a best selling book on these reforms "El Dilema de Espana", (Destino 2014).

Libertad González

Libertad González is a Professor of Economics at Universidad Pompeu Fabra and Barcelona GSE. She hods a PhD in Economics from Northwestern University, and has been a visitor at Columbia University and Boston University. Her research lies in the areas of Labor, Public, and Health Economics.

She has worked on a number of topics, including the economic effects of immigration, and her recent research focuses on the effects of public policy on fertility, female labor supply, and child health.

She has published in journals such as the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, the Journal of Human Resources, the European Economic Review, the Journal of Applied Econometrics, Labour Economics, etc

Theodora Xenogiani

Theodora Xenogiani is senior economist at the Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs of the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD). She works on projects related to international migration, the skills and labour market outcomes of migrants and migration and development. She is also teaching a graduate course at the Paris School of Economics. Previously, she worked as an Economist at the Employment Analysis and Policy division of the same directorate and contributed to the OECD Employment Outlook. Prior to that she worked at the OECD Development Centre on projects related to migration and development, informal employment and internal migration in China. She has also worked as researcher at the Overseas Development Institute in London and at the Centre for Research in Economics and Statistics (CREST) in Paris. Theodora holds a PhD from the London School of Economics, an MSc from the University of Warwick and a BSc from the Athens University of Economics and Business. Her research focuses on the issues of labour markets, social protection, migration and development, education and skills.

Béatrice d’Hombres

Béatrice d’Hombres has been a senior scientist at the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission since 2006. She holds a PhD in economics from the Centre for Studies and Research on International Development in France and has more than ten years of experience in applied micro-econometrics and impact evaluation methods. From 2013 to March 2016, she was the coordinator of the Centre for Research on Impact Evaluation (CRIE) at the JRC. Béatrice is now part of the JRC Composite Indicators Research Group.

She has been working on issues related to health economics, education, social capital, and labour economics. Recent work includes the impact of education on attitudes towards immigrants, and the effect of a smoking ban and health warnings on smoking behaviors. Béatrice has also worked on the role of social capital on health, the social consequences of income inequality and the inequity dimension of tertiary education systems. Her research has been published in international journals, including the European Economic Review, the Eastern Economic Journal, Health Economics, the BE Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy and Social Indicators Research.